Top 25 Margot Lee Shetterly Quotes

In this post, you will find great Margot Lee Shetterly Quotes. You can learn and implement many lessons from these quotes.

I started to think of 'Hidden Figures' as the first par

I started to think of ‘Hidden Figures‘ as the first part of a mid-century African-American trilogy.
Margot Lee Shetterly
You don’t get the good without the bad, but you really do have to see it all in order to make progress.
Margot Lee Shetterly
Every time you go to an airport and get on a plane, you are basically taking advantage of the work that was done at Langley. Between World War I and World War II, they did just tremendous amount of fundamental research into basically making airplanes safer, making them more stable.
Margot Lee Shetterly
My dad joined Langley in 1964 as a co-op student and retired in 2004 an internationally respected climate scientist.
Margot Lee Shetterly
Margot Lee Shetterly
We want the big stories, of course, of the great men, but there’s as much drama and interest and lessons to be learned in actions that people like us take on a daily basis.
Margot Lee Shetterly
My dad worked at NASA his whole career; he‘s a research scientist.
Margot Lee Shetterly
You can’t change history. These things happened the way they did. What you can change is how you look at it and how you understand that it takes the good moments and it takes the difficult moments to move forward.
Margot Lee Shetterly
There is so much talent among our young people; I hope the women in ‘Hidden Figures’ inspire them.
Margot Lee Shetterly
I knew a lot of black scientists, engineers, and mathematicians, and female mathematicians and engineers, women of all backgrounds. So this idea that anyone could be an engineer, a mathematician, or whatever, was something that I had grown up with and thought was really normal.
Margot Lee Shetterly
The Russians had got a real head-start into space; America was playing catch-up.
Margot Lee Shetterly
You need to decide that you’re going to use a story to enlighten and inspire people in the modern day.
Margot Lee Shetterly
As a callow 18-year-old leaving for college, I’d seen my home town as a mere launching pad for a life in worldlier locales, a place to be from rather than a place to be.
Margot Lee Shetterly
I remember ‘The Norfolk Journal and Guide,’ which is a black newspaper that still exists, but it was really influential, as you can imagine, in the Forties, Fifties, and Sixties. But all of their archives are online and digitized, and it was a really great resource.
Margot Lee Shetterly
A lot of times, when you have a story of minorities in America, it’s always this super, oppositional thing. It’s segregation, it’s the racism, and those are the hard facts of the story.
Margot Lee Shetterly
My dad worked with Mary Jackson very closely at one point. I knew Katherine Johnson as well. They were all part of this group of black engineers and scientists within this larger NASA community.
Margot Lee Shetterly
It has been very rare to see a black woman as a protagonist. And also as three-dimensional people – mathematicians, mothers, wives, complicated people, not perfect.
Margot Lee Shetterly
History happens as soon as I pick up my coffee cup – it happened 30 seconds ago. It’s history.
Margot Lee Shetterly
Growing up in Hampton, the face of science was brown like mine.
Margot Lee Shetterly
As much as I think it is necessary and desirable for white people to have an expanded view of the black American experience, it’s probably even more important for black people to have that expanded view.
Margot Lee Shetterly
A lot of times, we talk about black people as if being black is all they are. They get up, go to work… and are as complex and interesting and variable as any other group of people. We don’t often capture that or write about it.
Margot Lee Shetterly
Our next-door neighbour taught physics at Hampton University. Our church abounded with mathematicians. Supersonics experts held leadership positions in my mother‘s sorority, and electrical engineers sat on the board of my parents‘ college alumni associations.
Margot Lee Shetterly
During World War II, hundreds of thousands of people actually – and among them many African-American – migrated to the Hampton Roads area because of the job boom that was happening. It was a place where you could get stable war jobs.
Margot Lee Shetterly
For too long, history has imposed a binary condition on its black citizens: either nameless or renowned, menial or exceptional, passive recipients of the forces of history or superheroes who acquire mythic status not just because of their deeds but because of their scarcity.
Margot Lee Shetterly
I’m not a scientist or a mathematician.
Margot Lee Shetterly